Friday, 08 February 2013 16:52

Four Steps to Help - Watching 101

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Friday, 08 February 2013 16:50

Four Steps to Help Introduction 001

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Wednesday, 06 February 2013 23:37

Step Four - Helping

If a friend tells you they are thinking of suicide, never keep it a secret, even if you're asked to. Do not try to handle the situation on your own. You can be the most help by referring your friend to someone with the professional skills necessary to provide the help that he or she needs. You can continue to help by offering support.

 

Here are some ways to talk to your friend about getting help:

 

"I know where we can get some help."

"Let's talk to someone who can help. Let's call the helpline now."

"I can go with you to get some help"

 

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 If a friend mentions suicide, take it seriously. If they have expressed an immediate plan, or have access to prescription medication or other potentially deadly means, do not leave them alone. Get help immediately from your GP or another medical professional. If necessary take your friend to the nearest hospital or Accident and Emergency.

 

[HELPLINES]

Wednesday, 06 February 2013 23:36

Step Three - Asking

Talking with a friend about suicide will not put the idea into their head. There are so many taboos around suicide and talking about suicide that it is very confusing for young people who may need to discuss this very issue with their friends, family or another adult. 

 

Many young people tell us that when they have tried to talk about suicide they are met with various comments:

 

"We can't speak ill of the dead."

 

"I don't want that [suicide] brought to our door."

 

"If we say that word [suicide] it will happen"

 

"We'll just be putting ideas in your head"

 

It is vital to realise that TALKING ABOUT SUICIDE DOESN'T MAKE IT HAPPEN!

 

 

Here are some ways to ask questions in a caring, non-confrontational way:

 

"Have you ever thought about suicide?"

"Do you want to die or do you just want your problems to go away?"

 

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[STEP FOUR - HELPING]
Wednesday, 06 February 2013 23:36

Step Two - Showing

Let your friends and peers know that you really care. Ask about their feelings. Listen carefully to what they have to say.

 

Become a befriender - show a positive, supportive attitude to your friends and peers.

 

Here are some examples of how to begin the conversation:

 

"I'm worried about you/about how you feel."

"You mean a lot to me and I want to help."

"I'm here if you need someone to talk to."

 

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[STEP THREE - ASKING]

 

Wednesday, 06 February 2013 23:35

Step One - Watching

If someone is seriously depressed and thinking of attempting suicide there are often warning signs that family and friends can pick up on. Watching for these signs and acting upon them could save a life.

 

 Warnings signs may include but are not limited to:

 

  • Withdrawing from family and friends.
  • Having difficulty concentrating and thinking clearly.
  • Sleeping too much or too little.
  • Feeling tired most of the time.
  • Gaining or losing a significant amount of weight.
  • Talking about feeling hopeless or guilty.
  • Talking about suicide or death.
  • Self-destructive behaviour like drinking too much or abusing drugs.
  • Losing interest in favourite things or activities.
  • Giving away prized possessions.
  • Mood swings.

 

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[STEP TWO - SHOWING]

 

Tuesday, 05 February 2013 16:23

Four Steps to Help Slide Show

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Thursday, 07 February 2013 12:05

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Tuesday, 13 November 2012 15:12

Dealing with grief

If someone you care about has died by suicide, you may be feeling a whole range of different emotions - shock, disbelief, anger, guilt, grief.

You might be asking yourself:

  • "Why did they do it?"
  • "What could I have done to help?"

It is normal to try to make sense of something that seems senseless, but it is important to understand that you are not at fault.

After a suicide, sometimes people feel such intense emotional pain that they wonder if they can survive. If you feel this way, it is important to talk about your feelings with someone you trust, or you can call one of the national helplines to speak with a someone who will listen to you and understand what you are going through.

You may find it hard to believe now, but your grief will not always feel like this. Grief changes as you work through it, and eventually it will get easier to deal with your loss. Until then, talking to people you love and trust about how you feel can help you deal with your pain.

[HELPLINES]

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Tuesday, 13 November 2012 15:04

How to talking with an adult

Friends can help but sometimes what you are going through is too big to handle by yourself and you need an adult to get involved.

But who do you ask for help?

  • choose an adult you trust - maybe it is a family member or a neighbor, a favorite teacher, your priest or minister
  • you might also consider approaching your doctor or another health professional
  • or you could call a helpline

What do I say to start the conversation? Aren't they going to think I am crazy and need to be in a hospital?

  • Try asking them first if they have time to talk
  • Tell them that you want them to listen and not be quick to give advice or judge
  • Tell them that you are having a hard time, that you can't see any way out of your problems, and that you have thought about ending your life.

Most adults will try and listen to you carefully and offer you their support.  They will also have a good idea of where to get help, and if the matter is serious they can go with you to talk to the police or appropriate agency.

If you feel that the adult you have chosen is unresponsive, not taking you seriously or is being judgemental then you should thank them for listening and walk away.  Some adults have their own issues with suicide any they may not be a good choice to talk to about your concerns.  You should always try talking to another adult and not give up, your concerns and feelings are real and important and they deserve to be heard.  You can also talk to someone at one of the national helplines 24/7/365.

[HELPLINES]

 

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Warning Signs

Warning signs may include but are not limited to:
Withdrawing from family and friends
Having difficulty concentrating and thinking clearly
Sleeping too much or too little
Feeling tired most of the time
Gaining or losing a significant amount of weight
Talking about feeling hopeless or guilty
Talking about suicide or death
Self-destructive behaviour like drinking too much or abusing drugs
Losing interest in favourite things or activities
Giving away prized possessions
Mood swings
IMPORTANT
If a friend mentions suicide, take it seriously. If they have expressed an immediate plan, or have access to prescription medication or other potentially deadly means, do not leave them alone. Get help immediately.

Helplines

The Samaritans116 123
Pieta House1800 247 247
Aware1890 30 33 02
ISPCC Childline1800 66 66 66
Teen-Line Ireland1800 83 36 34

Contact Us

Youth Suicide Prevention Ireland (RCN20070670)
Atrium Business Centre
Blackpool Retail Park, Blackpool
Cork City, Ireland
Tel 021 - 242 7173
Email admin@yspi.eu